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Katherine Kachor

Column: Artist Profile   |   Date Published: Thursday, 16 March 17   |   Author: Andrew Nardi   |   1 week ago

What do you do?

I am a mixed media textile artist. I am a member of Untethered Fibre Artists. Working with textiles with an arty leaning is in my genes.

When, how and why did you get into it?

I come from a background of Scottish weavers and an English grandmother who was an artist’s apprentice. My father was a self-taught artist so I have been surrounded by “home grown” art all my life. I like quirky artworks and my personal collection of works has kindly been called “eclectic”.

Who/what influences you as an artist?

I reflect on day-to-day events in my life and those of people around me. My most recent piece of work, ‘There are Two Tides to this Story’, was to be about a friend’s marriage breakdown but the work didn’t resonate with me until I made it about my own experience. I particularly like figurative art as opposed to abstract art. And as I see myself as a storyteller, I am also drawn to artists whose works tell a story. Especially a personal story. Frida Kahlo is an artist I admire, although the pain in her work can be difficult to observe and absorb.

Of what are you proudest so far?

I very much value the support of members of Untethered Fibre Artists. We share a sense of fun and a commitment to work together, mentoring and engaging constructively with one another’s work.

What are your plans for the future?

My textile works are about “every day” circumstances or emotions. In the text I write, I like to play with words. Reading the text carefully, a word or words can have a double meaning. This double meaning, I hope, can leave the viewer with a sense of surprise. Grayson Perry wrote that, “It is his job to notice things that other people don’t notice”. I am hoping to continue to create works based on my observations and experiences, which will resonate with the viewer and have meaning. I invite the viewer of my work to read the text, look closely at the figures and reflect on the story/message being told.

What are your upcoming exhibitions?

‘There are Two Tides to this Story’ and a second piece of work ‘Knit One, Unravel One’ will be on display as part of ebb and flow, the Untethered Fibre Artists exhibition at Belconnen Arts Centre, Friday March 10 – Sunday April 2. The ebb and flow exhibition will then travel to Muswellbrook Regional Arts Centre, Muswellbrook from May 12 – July 2.

Contact info:

kacharucci@yahoo.com.au

Jane Bodnaruk:

What do you do?

I'm an artist working with textiles – especially second hand, fibres and textile techniques.

When, how and why did you get into it?

Dressmaking was part of my childhood, then stretch sewing for the children when they were little, followed by a flirtation with patchwork and quilting. I joined ATASDA (Australian Textile Arts and Surface Design Association) in NSW to expand my creative options. But it was when I did a workshop with Tasmanian artist, Ruth Hadlow, that my horizons widened and I discovered the challenges and satisfactions of combining research with textiles to create art with additional meaning. I began post-graduate studies at ANU in the Textiles workshop. This has been life changing, as I now devote as much time as possible to my art. My current research revolves around women, the hidden work of the ordinary, and the lives of Australia’s convict women. It is extraordinary finding a way to visually and emotionally honour these women, for whom there are so very few physical mementos.

Who/what influences you as an artist?

I’ve been reading a lot of historical fiction by and about Australian women (A Cargo of Women by Babette Smith 2008, Mrs Cook by Marelle Day 2002, Georgiana Molloy: The Mind That Shines by Bernice Barry 2016). Often the lives of the women may only be teased apart by studying the records associated with the men around them. In 2016, I saw the Fiona Hall exhibition – Wrong Way Time – at the NGA in Canberra. Her art practice encompasses research and a knack for quirky connections with fibres and found objects. Her work ‘Tender' (2003–2006) combines US bank notes with scientifically detailed nests of endangered and extinct birds.

Of what are you proudest so far?

I love my rope, which is in the untethered ebb and flow exhibition. It developed from my first process-led research project at ANU. I made lots of samples in all sorts of techniques before settling on the process of making this heavy, chunky rope. I worked on it almost every day over the equivalent time that it took the First Fleet to sail from Portsmouth to Port Jackson. I honoured the 193 convict women for each and every one of those 258 days. The ebb and flow of my daily life became entwined with the memory of those women. It brought to mind the words of Tim Ingold (Life of Lines, 2015), “Minds and lives … are open-ended processes whose most outstanding characteristic is that they carry on. And in carrying on, they wrap around one another like the many strands of a rope.”

What are your plans for the future?

I have been enjoying art gallery visits. The White Rabbit Gallery in Chippendale, Sydney has become a real favourite. I will continue reading about art, and of course practicing my art. I may continue my studies at ANU.

What makes you laugh?

My dogs and their funny little ways.

What pisses you off?

When my creative offspring borrow my art supplies and don’t return them.

What are your upcoming performances/exhibitions?

ebb and flow: an exhibition of contemporary fibre art, Belconnen Arts Centre, Friday March 10 – Sunday April 2. Official Opening: 5.30pm, 10 March 2017 118 Emu Bank, Belconnen, ACTOpening Hours: Tuesday – Sunday, 10:00am – 4:00pm.

Contact info:

untetheredfibreartists.com

Instagram: untethered.fibre.artists

facebook.com/untethered.exhibition.group

ATASDA: atasda.org.au

Carolyn Cabena:

What do you do?

As a textile artist I work with synthetic dyes and silk mainly, using various dyeing and printing techniques on scarves and wearables. Developing my art practice with more contemporary art pieces is a more recent interest. The magic of Naphtol dye has always intrigued me and for the ebb and flow exhibition I have used the resist qualities of this dye in a painterly way for my contemporary work ‘As I See It’. This trilogy of panels shows the formation of Uluru over many years by the movement of water.

When, how and why did you get into it?

30 years ago I followed my interest in design and textiles and studied batik with Kathleen Berney who introduced me to the Australian Batik Association, now ATASDA. Following many workshops with ATASDA I produced a range of garments with a distinctly Australian theme featuring the outback and native flora. The Australian Craft Show provided me with an outlet in the nineties and now the Society of Arts and Crafts of NSW gallery, Craft NSW in The Rocks, Sydney.

Who/what influences you as an artist?

Travel in outback Australia, taking photographs, personal memories and objects from the past. Initially influences were textile tutors and in particular Susan Holmes and Ruth Hadlow, who both taught me how to look inside myself … Now I admire indigenous artists and their very personal interpretation of our landscape.

Of what are you proudest so far?

I am always striving for that elusive work that appeals to others and has meaning. By being true to myself, I feel my artworks are evolving towards this end. Satisfied would be a better word than proud, as I think it is important to be confident in what you do.

What are your plans for the future?

Travel both in Australia and overseas for pleasure and in search of inspiration for my next project. My plans are to continue producing my wearables as well as being part of the Untethered group, which allows me to extend myself in creating contemporary work for exhibitions. Life is never boring when there is research to pursue for a new theme that includes visits to galleries and museums.

What makes you laugh?

The antics of little children imitating grownups.

What pisses you off?

Artist Statements at exhibitions that are too small to read and badly lit.

What are your upcoming exhibitions?

ebb and flow: Friday March 10 – Sunday April 2 at Belconnen Arts Centre.
Stitched UP: Friday June 23 – Sunday August 6 at The Lockup, 90 Hunter Street, Newcastle.

Contact info:

ccabena1@bigpond.com

facebook.com/carolyncabena

Instagram: Carolyn Cabena

 

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